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    The Blue Goose

    4426 West 4900 South, Samaria, ID 83252

    Clarence Hughes runs this charming 1892 store, which was moved to the town park in Samaria to keep it from being torn down. It’s a popular hangout for school kids and farmers in the afternoon. He sells local crafts, cookbooks, candy and sodas, and has video rentals. Historic photos and...

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    Samaria Historic District

    4598 S 4400 W, Malad City, ID 83252

    Samaria, about 9 miles southwest of Malad, was once the largest town in the Malad Valley. Settled in 1868 by homesteaders, the town did well until the railroad was routed through Malad. After that, the primary businesses developed around the railroad terminal, and Samaria remained a farming...

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    Samaria Cemetery and a Local Legend

    4900 W 5000 S, Malad City, ID 83252

    You can find a variety of old and new style headstones in this cemetery, including a headstone for a man’s amputated leg. In 1878, Ben Waldron lost his leg in a threshing accident. The leg was buried on the east side of the cemetery and was given a headstone with a leg carved on it, along with...

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    Oneida County Courthouse

    10 W Court St, Malad City, ID 83252

    This is an Art Deco brick veneer building built in 1939 as part of a WPA project. It has an elaborate terra cotta...

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    Evans Co-op Building and True Value Hardware

    25 North Main Street, Malad 83252

    This block housed the first department store in Idaho, the Evans Co-op, which was part of the Mormon cooperative movement of the 1860s, in which local production and purchasing was encouraged through cooperatives. The block, including both the co-op building and the old J.N. Ireland Bank, is on...

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    City of Malad

    331 50 N, Malad City, ID 83252

    The town of Malad got its name from the fact that when Donald McKenzie brought a party of trappers through the area between 1818 and 1821, they drank the river water and got sick. The Frenchmen named the river the Malad, meaning illness. The town was settled in 1862, after the passage of the...